By Monica E. Oss Traveling around the world gives you a different perspective on health care. In France and Spain, for example, pharmacists provide a wide range of primary care services. That is happening, much more slowly, in the United States. The shortage of primary care professionals is forcing policy makers to take another a look at the training and skills of pharmacists. In 47 states and the District of Columbia there are collaborative pharmacy practice agreements that allow pharmacists to manage diabetes and other chronic illnesses, and a new pilot in Rhode Island allows pharmacists to provide follow-up care for people suffering from…
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