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By Market Intelligence Team

Saturday, December 4, 2010

The issue of promoting clinicians to managers has sparked a lot of discussion – both here in the OPEN MINDS office and from among our readers. Over the past several days, we’ve heard many different perspectives and some very insightful points that should make us all consider how this issue is affecting the field.

Carlton F. Clark, LCSW of Psychotherapy & Organizational Development, LLC, shared some of his thoughts on how we can start to think of solutions to this problem. As I mentioned in my initial post (Misunderstood Motivations Lead To Bad Management Decisions all members), regulations and reimbursement systems both contribute to a management deficit in our field. Mr. Clark believes that the development of actual on-going competency-based learning for managers and providers, along with restructuring compensation, would go a long way to achieving better management decisions and better services to consumers. Purchasers of services imagine they are buying things rather than skills. Perhaps they could awaken to the real costs of purchasing sub-standard organizational services.

I think Mr. Clark hit on a good point, one that was also mentioned by Bill Milnor the other day (Weeding Out the “Clinicians in Managers’ Clothing” all members), managers—whether they are former clinicians or not—need ongoing development. There needs to be mentoring early on in a career and ongoing learning throughout one’s lifetime. As Dr. Debora Fisher mentioned (Just Like Algebra, Management is Truly a Useful Skill all members), management and business training should to be thought of as a part of a clinician’s role throughout their career.

There is no easy answer to addressing this problem system-wide, but having this discussion brings the issue forward and can help us to all recognize it when we see it within our own organizations.

If you would like to share your thoughts on the manager-to-clinician career path or if you have any questions about addressing these issues within your own organization, you can e-mail me at openminds@openminds.com.

 

Sincerely,
Rejean Carlson,
Vice President of Business Operations,
OPEN MINDS

 

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To read more on this topic, you can view: Does an MBA Qualify You To Be a Clinician? all members 

This is free for the next sixty days to all registered OPEN MINDS Circle members.

 

Back to top

By Market Intelligence Team

The issue of promoting clinicians to managers has sparked a lot of discussion – both here in the OPEN MINDS office and from among our readers. Over the past several days, we’ve heard many different perspectives and some very insightful points that should make us all consider how this issue is affecting the field.

Carlton F. Clark, LCSW of Psychotherapy & Organizational Development, LLC, shared some of his thoughts on how we can start to think of solutions to this problem. As I mentioned in my initial post (Misunderstood Motivations Lead To Bad Management Decisions all members), regulations and reimbursement systems both contribute to a management deficit in our field. Mr. Clark believes that the development of actual on-going competency-based learning for managers and providers, along with restructuring compensation, would go a long way to achieving better management decisions and better services to consumers. Purchasers of services imagine they are buying things rather than skills. Perhaps they could awaken to the real costs of purchasing sub-standard organizational services.

I think Mr. Clark hit on a good point, one that was also mentioned by Bill Milnor the other day (Weeding Out the “Clinicians in Managers’ Clothing” all members), managers—whether they are former clinicians or not—need ongoing development. There needs to be mentoring early on in a career and ongoing learning throughout one’s lifetime. As Dr. Debora Fisher mentioned (Just Like Algebra, Management is Truly a Useful Skill all members), management and business training should to be thought of as a part of a clinician’s role throughout their career.

There is no easy answer to addressing this problem system-wide, but having this discussion brings the issue forward and can help us to all recognize it when we see it within our own organizations.

If you would like to share your thoughts on the manager-to-clinician career path or if you have any questions about addressing these issues within your own organization, you can e-mail me at openminds@openminds.com.

 

Sincerely,
Rejean Carlson,
Vice President of Business Operations,
OPEN MINDS

 

Back to top

 

To read more on this topic, you can view: Does an MBA Qualify You To Be a Clinician? all members 

This is free for the next sixty days to all registered OPEN MINDS Circle members.

 

Back to top

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