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By Market Intelligence Team

Friday, December 3, 2010

Like the algebra classes we all sat through and thought we would never use, it turns out management education is useful after all. This week we’ve been discussing the challenges of management in the health and human services field (Does an MBA Qualify You To Be a Clinician? all members), and today I would like to focus on management education. OPEN MINDS Circle member Deborah M. Fisher, Psy.D., Deputy Director, Jewish Foundation for Group Homes, shared her thoughts on the importance of management education for the field as a whole, clinicians included:

As a clinician who became a manager when I expanded my private clinical psychology practice to include associates and various products, I started to learn about the unique finance, personnel issues, marketing strategies, and customer relations challenges that a successful business requires. […]

It all leads me back to the one complaint that I had with the otherwise superb graduate education that I had, which is that business management, leadership development, organizational change – any and possibly all of these areas should be included in all clinical training programs. While all clinicians may believe that all they ever want to do is see clients, the truth is that even in “just” seeing clients, they are small business owners and should understand what types of business practices are necessary for doing so competently and successfully.

Further, considering the types of Continuing Ed courses that are offered, I cannot recall one that ever focused on the business and management skills necessary to move clinicians into different roles and responsibilities.[…] To me, the problem rests with the clinician community as a whole for not valuing the importance of gaining training in management/business, and clinicians individually who do not acknowledge that to be in private practice is to be a small business entrepreneur, and to work in a clinic or social services agency or hospital, is to be a middle or executive manager of an organization – either for-profit or non-profit.

We’ll continue our discussion on this topic tomorrow. If you would like to join the conversation, e-mail me at openminds@openminds.com.

Sincerely,
Rejean Carlson,
Vice President of Business Operations,
OPEN MINDS

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To read more on this topic, you can view: Weeding Out the “Clinicians in Managers’ Clothing” all members 

This is free for the next sixty days to all registered OPEN MINDS Circle members.

 

Back to top

By Market Intelligence Team

Like the algebra classes we all sat through and thought we would never use, it turns out management education is useful after all. This week we’ve been discussing the challenges of management in the health and human services field (Does an MBA Qualify You To Be a Clinician? all members), and today I would like to focus on management education. OPEN MINDS Circle member Deborah M. Fisher, Psy.D., Deputy Director, Jewish Foundation for Group Homes, shared her thoughts on the importance of management education for the field as a whole, clinicians included:

As a clinician who became a manager when I expanded my private clinical psychology practice to include associates and various products, I started to learn about the unique finance, personnel issues, marketing strategies, and customer relations challenges that a successful business requires. […]

It all leads me back to the one complaint that I had with the otherwise superb graduate education that I had, which is that business management, leadership development, organizational change – any and possibly all of these areas should be included in all clinical training programs. While all clinicians may believe that all they ever want to do is see clients, the truth is that even in “just” seeing clients, they are small business owners and should understand what types of business practices are necessary for doing so competently and successfully.

Further, considering the types of Continuing Ed courses that are offered, I cannot recall one that ever focused on the business and management skills necessary to move clinicians into different roles and responsibilities.[…] To me, the problem rests with the clinician community as a whole for not valuing the importance of gaining training in management/business, and clinicians individually who do not acknowledge that to be in private practice is to be a small business entrepreneur, and to work in a clinic or social services agency or hospital, is to be a middle or executive manager of an organization – either for-profit or non-profit.

We’ll continue our discussion on this topic tomorrow. If you would like to join the conversation, e-mail me at openminds@openminds.com.

Sincerely,
Rejean Carlson,
Vice President of Business Operations,
OPEN MINDS

Back to top

 

To read more on this topic, you can view: Weeding Out the “Clinicians in Managers’ Clothing” all members 

This is free for the next sixty days to all registered OPEN MINDS Circle members.

 

Back to top

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