Skip to main content
By Market Intelligence Team

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Last week, I started a discussion about the challenges of building a service delivery organization with a good management team and experienced clinical staff (Misunderstood Motivations Lead To Bad Management Decisions all members). What I wasn’t prepared for was the avalanche of great commentary and ideas that I received as a result. Over the next few days, I would like to share some of our members’ observations on the state of management.

OPEN MINDS Circle member, Ronald Hunsicker, shared his opinion based on his experiences in the addictions field: I think that we have had nearly a generation of this activity, and it has resulted in a great deal of confusion in terms of what management is – as well as what are the skill sets that should be sought in bringing staff into management positions.

I know that on the addiction side there was an emphasis about 20+ years ago to develop a credential that would indicate some level of competency in terms of administrative and management skills. At that time there was a push to see hospital (now health care) administrators as potential peers, and so the thinking was to make sure that addiction administrators had some similar skills. Now, that emphasis seems to have fallen by the way. Individuals seem to be less concerned about specific skill sets, less inclined to be part of the larger health care policy debate, and less willing to make the effort to develop a comprehensive understanding of the delivery and payment system.

Another of our members, Richard Maye, gave voice to a point that I’ve discussed with many of our clients: A clinician is allowed to practice as an administrator with no training whatsoever, yet I cannot enter into their field without training and licenses. Without some base line fundamental education/training/experience in the art of management it is a set up for failure for the person and often the organization.

Richard also made the excellent point that there are, of course, unique exceptions to the issues that we’ve been discussing. But from the majority of feedback that I’ve received, it seems that many people in the field are frustrated with this problem.

We’ll continue sharing our reader’s responses to this important issue; in the meantime, please feel free to e-mail me your comments at openminds@openminds.com.

Sincerely,
Rejean Carlson,
Vice President of Business Operations,
OPEN MINDS

Back to top

 

You can read more in, Five Pillars To Support Your Management Infrastructure all members 

This is free for the next sixty days to all registered OPEN MINDS Circle members.

 

Back to top

By Market Intelligence Team

Last week, I started a discussion about the challenges of building a service delivery organization with a good management team and experienced clinical staff (Misunderstood Motivations Lead To Bad Management Decisions all members). What I wasn’t prepared for was the avalanche of great commentary and ideas that I received as a result. Over the next few days, I would like to share some of our members’ observations on the state of management.

OPEN MINDS Circle member, Ronald Hunsicker, shared his opinion based on his experiences in the addictions field: I think that we have had nearly a generation of this activity, and it has resulted in a great deal of confusion in terms of what management is – as well as what are the skill sets that should be sought in bringing staff into management positions.

I know that on the addiction side there was an emphasis about 20+ years ago to develop a credential that would indicate some level of competency in terms of administrative and management skills. At that time there was a push to see hospital (now health care) administrators as potential peers, and so the thinking was to make sure that addiction administrators had some similar skills. Now, that emphasis seems to have fallen by the way. Individuals seem to be less concerned about specific skill sets, less inclined to be part of the larger health care policy debate, and less willing to make the effort to develop a comprehensive understanding of the delivery and payment system.

Another of our members, Richard Maye, gave voice to a point that I’ve discussed with many of our clients: A clinician is allowed to practice as an administrator with no training whatsoever, yet I cannot enter into their field without training and licenses. Without some base line fundamental education/training/experience in the art of management it is a set up for failure for the person and often the organization.

Richard also made the excellent point that there are, of course, unique exceptions to the issues that we’ve been discussing. But from the majority of feedback that I’ve received, it seems that many people in the field are frustrated with this problem.

We’ll continue sharing our reader’s responses to this important issue; in the meantime, please feel free to e-mail me your comments at openminds@openminds.com.

Sincerely,
Rejean Carlson,
Vice President of Business Operations,
OPEN MINDS

Back to top

 

You can read more in, Five Pillars To Support Your Management Infrastructure all members 

This is free for the next sixty days to all registered OPEN MINDS Circle members.

 

Back to top

Login to access The OPEN MINDS Circle Library. Not a member? Create your free account now!

Close

Support Request

Need help now?

Call our toll-free phone number 877-350-6463